Tag Archives: rising sea

The Problem with Beach Nourishment

Below excerpts are borrowed courtesy of a December 10th article and video published by Vox. The full article is available here.

About 80 to 90 percent of sandy beaches along America’s coastlines are eroding. This is a problem because the developments humans build near them are static. So as beaches shrink, coastal hazards can threaten to damage or destroy homes and businesses while negatively impacting tourism that depends on the beach.

The most popular strategy to counter these risks is a process called beach nourishment. Coastal engineers will add new sand to an eroding beach in order to rebuild or expand the shoreline.

But researchers discovered that coastal defense schemes like beach nourishment may ultimately do more harm than good by providing a false sense of security in critically eroding areas. There is evidence that beach nourishment can “mask or reduce the apparent impact of coastal hazards without changing the natural processes driving them.”

Visit the original article here.

Could Dredging Quogue’s Ocean Floor Harm Our Beachfront?

We are all stewards of our beach. All homeowners in Quogue consider our ocean beaches a precious natural resource, and all should have a say on any proposal that would alter our coastline.

The impact on Quogue’s oceanfront will not only affect a specific area (an est.1.3 miles of Quogue beach) as is proposed, but our entire 2.7 miles of oceanfront and our community as a whole. Continue reading Could Dredging Quogue’s Ocean Floor Harm Our Beachfront?

Large Buildings Threaten N.C. Beaches

Orrin Pilkey, Professor Emeritus of Geology at Duke University, has been at the forefront of visionary thinking on coastal adaptation. Dr. Pilkey has authored multiple books examining coastal processes and government’s response to a moving coastline in the face of sea level rise. His recent article, Large Buildings Threaten N.C. Beaches, explains how coastal development–by transforming from small cottages to large-scale homes and development–has increased the demand for beach nourishment and inevitably leads to destructive seawalls.

We were very pleased to learn that the Quogue Village Trustees determined earlier this year that a beach nourishment project is not a prudent course of action at this time. Public education and participation was an important factor in their decision. Going forward, it’s essential that our Quogue community stay informed and remain part of the evolving conversation on the future of our beaches.