Important Public Hearing Set for 8/10 in Quogue

In response to the overwhelming number of concerns expressed by the Quogue community regarding a proposed dredging project for the Village, the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation will conduct a public hearing on August 10 at 6pm, in the Quogue Village Hall court room.

A state-appointed judge will preside over the meeting, which presents an opportunity for citizens to voice their concerns in person. Public input will be critical in determining whether the application for the proposed $15 million project will be approved.

To read a summary of the concerns expressed, please click here. To read the public notice, click here.

Click here to add this event to your calendar.

Army Corps of Engineers Issues Public Notice to Quogue Village Residents

CCQ has obtained notice that a public comment period has been opened by the US Army Corps of Engineers regarding the permit application for a dredging project in Quogue.

The Corps is soliciting public comments to consider and evaluate the impacts of the project and has stated that any person may request, in writing, that a public hearing be held to collect information necessary to consider the application.

The comment period expires on August 5th.

If you would like to submit a comment, please do so in writing and address to Naomi Handell, at naomi.j.handell@usace.army.mil by August 5th. Mailed letters may be sent to:

US Army Corps of Engineers
New York District
Jacob K. Javits Federal Building
New York, NY 10278

Please reference Public Notice Number NAN-2012-00011-EHA.

To read the public notice in its entirety, please click here.

For an in-depth and multi-faceted perspective on the proposed Quogue project (authored by Dr. Robert S. Young, Director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines), please click here.

Why Sand Is Disappearing

Below excerpts are from a November 4th editorial in The New York Times, here.

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“Today, 75 to 90 percent of the world’s natural sand beaches are disappearing, due partly to rising sea levels and increased storm action, but also to massive erosion caused by the human development of shores. Many low-lying barrier islands are already submerged…

“Yet the extent of this global crisis is obscured because so-called beach nourishment projects attempt to hold sand in place and repair the damage by the time summer people return, creating the illusion of an eternal shore…

“Before next summer, endless lines of dump trucks will have filled in bare spots and restored dunes. Virginia Beach alone has been restored more than 50 times. In recent decades, East Coast barrier islands have used 23 million loads of sand, much of it mined inland and the rest dredged from coastal waters—a practice that disturbs the sea bottom, creating turbidity that kills coral beds and damages spawning grounds, which hurts inshore fisheries…

Click here to read the entire article. Watch a TEDx video presentation on the topic, below.