All posts by Gregg T

Exposed With Every Storm

Below excerpts are from an April 19th comment by Defend H2O Founder Kevin McAllister in The East Hampton Star, here.

In the aftermath of three powerful winter storms, the status of Montauk’s downtown beach has once again been thrust into the public spotlight.

While this commentary is about forward-looking coastal zone management, it’s important to reflect on previous decisions to provide a clear vision for adaptive change. Namely, rejecting a structural approach to coastal erosion and recognizing the pitfalls of beach replenishment in order to move forward with coastal retreat…

Large buildings threaten N.C. beaches

Orrin Pilkey, Professor Emeritus of Geology at Duke University, has been at the forefront of visionary thinking on coastal adaptation. Dr. Pilkey has authored multiple books examining coastal processes and government’s response to a moving coastline in the face of sea level rise. His recent article, Large Buildings Threaten N.C. Beaches, explains how coastal development–by transforming from small cottages to large-scale homes and development–has increased the demand for beach nourishment and inevitably leads to destructive seawalls.

We were very pleased to learn that the Quogue Village Trustees determined earlier this year that a beach nourishment project is not a prudent course of action at this time. Public education and participation was an important factor in their decision. Going forward, it’s essential that our Quogue community stay informed and remain part of the evolving conversation on the future of our beaches.

Beach Replenishment May Have ‘Far Reaching’ Impacts on Ecosystems

UC San Diego biologists who examined the biological impact of replenishing eroded beaches with offshore sand found that such beach replenishment efforts could have long-term negative impacts on coastal ecosystems.

The scientists, who studied the effects of beach replenishment efforts on the abundance of intertidal invertebrates at eight different beaches in San Diego County, discovered that the movement of sand onto those beaches resulted in a more than twofold reduction in the abundance of intertidal invertebrates after 15 months.

“Such reductions may have far reaching consequences for sandy beach ecosystems,” the researchers warn in their paper, “as community declines can reduce prey availability for shorebirds and fish.”

Read the full article by clicking here.